late summer corn

Corn Relish

August 27th.  How is that even possible?  I’ve spent this past week on a little vacation to the future in-laws’ house outside of Philly and have enjoyed sleeping with the windows open and a few much-needed cooler training runs.  But I’m not ready to say bye to Summer 2010 yet.  It’s been a great one.  

Corn Relish

Weekly volleyball at North Ave beach with my team of friends, “The Trampled Flowers.”  Lots of miles logged along the lakefront and in Lincoln Park with CES.  Plenty of Sunday nights watching Mad Men and True Blood while eating takeout and drinking wine.

Corn Relish

And of course the farmers’ markets! Man, I forgot how hard it is to get your fill of all the summer’s bounty before the days quickly turn into fall. But good thing I made a batch of this corn relish last weekend. Of course it’s easy to just freeze a bunch of corn, cut from the cob, in a gallon sized bag to have around to toss into winter soups or a batch of cornbread, but this relish really takes corn to a whole ‘nother lever.

Corn Relish

You combine a bunch of corn, quickly blanched and cut from the cob* with a few roasted bell peppers and jalapenos, and some sauteed onions and garlic. This gets mixed with a sorta brine of apple cider vinegar and sugar, cooked down, then spooned into jars. I can’t wait to tuck a jar in the back of my fridge to find in a few months, when, sadly, ears of bi-color corn are long gone from the market.

Corn Relish with Roasted Peppers
Recipe adapted from Food & Wine

*A really easy way to cut corn from cobs is to stick a small bowl upside down in the bottom of a large bowl, using the small bowl as a prop to keep the cob up while you cut down, allowing the kernels to be caught in the bowl.

Ingredients:
12 ears of corn, shucked
1 red bell pepper
1 green bell pepper
4 jalapeños
1 1/2 cups apple cider vinegar
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 Spanish onion, finely diced
2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
Salt

DIRECTIONS
If you don’t have a gas stove, preheat your oven to 400F. Have a large bowl handy and set aside. In a large pot of boiling water, cook the corn until the kernels become slightly translucent, about 3 minutes. Transfer the corn to the bowl and run cool water over the cobs to quickly lower their temperature. Drain the corn and pat dry. Cut off the kernels.*

Roast the bell peppers and jalapeños over a gas flame, turning, until charred all over, about 5 minutes, or, on a baking sheet in a 400F oven, turning every 5 minutes until charred. Transfer to a bowl, cover, and let cool slightly. Peel, stem, and seed the peppers and jalapeños. Cut the bell peppers into 1/2-inch dice and the jalapeños into 1/4-inch dice.

In a dutch oven, combine the vinegar and sugar and bring to a boil, stirring. Add the corn, peppers, jalapeños, onion, and mustard, and bring to a boil. Simmer for 15 minutes. Season with salt and let cool.

Ladle the corn relish into 1-pint canning jars (I managed close to 5, but the recipe called for 4) and refrigerate for up to 3 months.

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6 responses to “late summer corn

  1. This looks so tasty and I love your tip for cutting corn off the cob! We’ve been buying corn to add to meals “just because” the last few weeks because how can you NOT have it when you live in the midwest?? It’s so good. Canning though, now that’s an excellent idea! Happy summer!

  2. I absolutely LOVE LOVE LOVE corn relish. I could literally eat it on everything! I bet this one tastes great because it sounds so yummy. Send me some!!! ;-) Hows wedding planning going???

  3. Wow, this sounds great! I spent last weekend freezing a bunch of corn, and with that plus spaghetti sauce my freezer is pretty full (which didn’t stop me from buying more corn at the farmers’ market today, because how can you not?).

  4. Yum! I’ve never made corn relish, but I’ve just added it to my list. :) I use a bundt cake pan to remove kernels from the cob, very similar to your double bowl trick!

  5. This was so yummy today! :)

  6. Pingback: the best cornbread, seriously | Whitney in Chicago

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